Will. I. Am.

 

Ohio Native. 21 years old. BMW Enthusiast. Amateur Photography. Bassist.

viiroots:

Biggie
viiroots:

Biggie
fuckyeahfoxfriends:

This may be the most beautiful fox I’ve ever seen
fuckyeahfoxfriends:

This may be the most beautiful fox I’ve ever seen
yungshorty:

ゲットーの王女
yungshorty:

ゲットーの王女

fleeten:

don’t stare at the moon too long or else you’ll remember that nothing in this stupid fucking world makes sense

(via northwestdirt)


Aerial | Baptise Debombourg.
Shattering glass flooding into a room of Brauweiler Abbey in Germany.
mattjonesphotography:

The view from one of our tea house rooms (roughly $2 a night) walking our way to Gokyo.  Trekking through Nepal’s Himalayas isn’t as expensive as some people might think.B-Sides from 'Lakes of Gokyo'
mattjonesphotography:

The view from one of our tea house rooms (roughly $2 a night) walking our way to Gokyo.  Trekking through Nepal’s Himalayas isn’t as expensive as some people might think.B-Sides from 'Lakes of Gokyo'
turddemon:

Allyson Gutchell, 2013
turddemon:

Allyson Gutchell, 2013
viiroots:

VII
viiroots:

VII
corporisfabrica:


Coronal and ventral x-rays of the hammerhead shark, Sphyrna mokarran.
The distinguishing feature of this animal is, of course, the highly unusual skull shape. You may once have wondered what exactly this seemingly clumsy structure contributes to this fearsome predator, and biologists still do. However, a number of theories exist to explain this unique adaptation; here are some of the best:
All the better to see you with: mounting the eyes at either end of the broad skull allows excellent vision in all areas of the vertical plane. Hammerhead sharks, as hunters of bottom-dwelling animals, can use this superior angle of vision to better locate prey. 
Another pair of fins. The head has evolved into the shape of an effective hydrofoil. It is thought that this may provide greater stability to the shark when making sharp turns and hunting.
Heartbeat sensor. Like many sharks, the hammerhead possesses specialised electrosensory organs called the ampullae of Lorenzini. With these, it can detect the magnetic activity of the Earth and find its heading by means of biological compass. Much more impressively, the hammerhead can detect the minuscule electrical activity emitted by the muscle contractions of its prey, allowing location even when hidden from sight. Almost like a skull-mounted metal detector, the shark may sweep the seabed. All it takes is a heartbeat to give the game away. 
Photo credit to Dan Anderson.
I used to walk into a room full of people and wonder if they liked me… now I look around and wonder if I like them. Rikkie Gale (via 1millionyengirl)

(Source: wnq-writers, via savdiarabia)